Idaho Traumatic Brain Injury
Virtual Program Center

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Institute of Rural Health
Idaho State University

Mission


Mission of the Idaho Traumatic Brain Injury Program

To work with Idahoans affected by brain injury to provide individualized support and resources through collaboration with community partners.

Purpose of the Idaho Traumatic Brain Injury Program

The purpose of the TBI State Partnership Program is to create and strengthen person-centered, culturally competent systems of services and supports that maximize the independence and overall health and well-being of people with TBI across the lifespan and the people who support them. As a result of the TBI
State Partnership Program, AoD envisions individuals with TBI will experience:

Increased self-determination, independence, and quality of life, highly streamlined,
coordinated pathways to services and supports; Increased availability of high quality, person-centered, culturally competent, evidence-based services and supports; Person-centered, culturally
competent services and supports with the capacity to serve and support diverse and under served populations.

Goal: Expand Support for Persons with a TBI in Idaho
Obj. Develop Annual TBI State Plan
Obj. Enhance Use of Idaho Trauma Registry/Time Sensitive Emergency Response System
Obj. Expand TBI Screenings

Incidence and Prevalence of Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability among children and young
adults in the United States. Each year an estimated 1.5 million Americans sustain a TBI. As a
consequence of these injuries:

  • 230,000 people are hospitalized and survive.
  • 50,000 people die.
  • 80,000 to 90,000 people experience the onset of long-term disability.

As the cumulative result of past traumatic brain injuries, an estimated 5.3 million men, women,
and children are living with a permanent TBI-related disability in the United States today.

While the risk of having a TBI is substantial among all age groups, this risk is highest among
adolescents, young adults, and persons older than 75 years. The risk of TBI among males is
twice the risk among females. The major causes of TBI are:

  • Motor vehicle crashes–the leading cause of TBI resulting in hospitalization.
  • Violence, especially suicidal behavior and assaults that involve firearms–the leading cause of TBI-related death.
  • Falls–the leading cause of TBI among the elderly.

These injuries have both short-term and long-term effects on individuals, their families, and
society and their financial cost is enormous. According to one study, the annual economic burden
in the United States was approximately $37.8 billion in 1985.

The Institute of Rural Health at Idaho State University has been funded since 2001 and the Idaho
TBI Program is currently funded under the Traumatic Brain Injury State Grant Program. The
Idaho TBI Program has been funded to develop and promote services for people with TBI.

This project is supported in part by grant number 90TBSG0041-01-00 from the U.S
Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services
(HHS), Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship
are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do
not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.

This project is supported in part by grant number H21MC26926 from the U.S Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Washington, D.C. 20201 and Idaho State University. This project was previously supported in part by grant # 1-H21-MC07735, using funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Health Resources Services Administration's (HRSA's) Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and Idaho State University. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. The content contained herein are solely those of the authors and points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy, the view or policies of the U.S. Government, the State of Idaho, or Idaho State University